Laws: Landlord Notice to Enter Guide (2024)

As a landlord, understanding your rights and responsibilities when it comes to entering a tenant’s dwelling is crucial for maintaining a respectful and lawful relationship with your renters. One of the most important aspects to consider is providing proper notice before entering an occupied rental unit. This essential guide for landlords nationwide, offering a comprehensive overview of the varying state laws and requirements concerning notice to enter.

This article will serve as a quick reference to ensure you’re in compliance with local regulations and respecting tenant privacy, while also taking care of your property management duties efficiently and legally. Whether you’re performing routine inspections, making necessary repairs, or showing the property to prospective tenants, this cheat sheet will help you navigate the nuances of landlord entry with confidence.

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Alabama

  • Required Notice: 2 days
  • Laws: § 35–9A-303

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Alaska

  • Required Notice: 24 hours
  • Laws: § 34.03.140

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Arizona

  • Required Notice: 48 hours
  • Laws: § 33–1343

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Arkansas

  • Required Notice: N/A
  • Laws: N/A

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California

  • Required Notice: 24 hours for non-emergency, 48 hours for the move-out inspection
  • Laws: § 1954

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Colorado

  • Required Notice: *N/A
  • Laws: *N/A

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Connecticut

  • Required Notice: Reasonable notice
  • Laws: § 47a-16

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Delaware

  • Required Notice: 48 hours
  • Laws: Title 25 § 5509

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Florida

  • Required Notice: 24 hours
  • Laws: § 83.53

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Georgia

  • Required Notice: *N/A
  • Laws: *N/A

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Hawaii

  • Required Notice: 2 days
  • Laws: § 521–53

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Idaho

  • Required Notice: *N/A
  • Laws: *N/A

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Illinois

  • Required Notice: *N/A (Outside Chicago – Not defined; Chicago only – 2 days)
  • Laws: *N/A (Chicago Municipal Code 5–12–130)

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Indiana

  • Required Notice: Reasonable notice
  • Laws: § 32–31–5–6

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Iowa

  • Required Notice: 24 hours
  • Laws: § 562A.19

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Kansas

  • Required Notice: Reasonable notice
  • Laws: § 58–2557

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Kentucky

  • Required Notice: 2 days
  • Laws: § 383.615

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Louisiana

  • Required Notice: *N/A
  • Laws: *N/A

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Maine

  • Required Notice: 24 hours
  • Laws: § 6025

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Maryland

  • Required Notice: *N/A
  • Laws: *N/A

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Massachusetts

  • Required Notice: Reasonable notice
  • Laws: Sanitary Code (410.810)

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Michigan

  • Required Notice: *N/A
  • Laws: *N/A

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Minnesota

  • Required Notice: “Reasonable notice” of no less than 24 hours
  • Laws: § 504B.211

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Mississippi

  • Required Notice: *N/A
  • Laws: *N/A

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Missouri

  • Required Notice: *N/A
  • Laws: *N/A

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Montana

  • Required Notice: 24 hours
  • Laws: § 70–24–312

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Nebraska

  • Required Notice: 24 hours
  • Laws: § 76–1423

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Nevada

  • Required Notice: 24 hours
  • Laws: NRS 118A.330

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New Hampshire

  • Required Notice: Reasonable notice
  • Laws: RSA 540-A:3

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New Jersey

  • Required Notice: 1 day
  • Laws: § 5:10–5.1

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New Mexico

  • Required Notice: 24 hours
  • Laws: § 47–8–24

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New York

  • Required Notice: *N/A
  • Laws: *N/A

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North Carolina

  • Required Notice: *N/A
  • Laws: *N/A

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North Dakota

  • Required Notice: Reasonable notice
  • Laws: § 47–16–07.3

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Ohio

  • Required Notice: 24 hours
  • Laws: § 5321.04

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Oklahoma

  • Required Notice: 1 day
  • Laws: § 41–128

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Oregon

  • Required Notice: 24 hours
  • Laws: § 90.322

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Pennsylvania

  • Required Notice: *N/A
  • Laws: *N/A

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Rhode Island

  • Required Notice: 2 days
  • Laws: § 34–18–26

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South Carolina

  • Required Notice: 24 hours
  • Laws: § 27–40–530

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South Dakota

  • Required Notice: 24 hours
  • Laws: § 43–32–32

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Tennessee

  • Required Notice: 24 hours
  • Laws: § 66–28–403

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Texas

  • Required Notice: *N/A
  • Laws: *N/A

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Utah

  • Required Notice: 24 hours
  • Laws: § 57–22–4

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Vermont

  • Required Notice: 48 hours
  • Laws: § 4460

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Virginia

  • Required Notice: 24 hours
  • Laws: § 55.1–1229(A)

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Washington

  • Required Notice: 2 days for repairs, 1 day for showings
  • Laws: § 59.18.150

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West Virginia

  • Required Notice: *N/A
  • Laws: *N/A

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Wisconsin

  • Required Notice: Advance Notice
  • Laws: § 704.05(2)

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Wyoming

  • Required Notice: *N/A
  • Laws: *N/A

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Do landlords have to give notice before entering?

Yes, landlords typically have to give notice before entering a tenant’s rental unit. The amount of notice required varies by state and sometimes by local laws. In many places, the notice period is 24 hours, but it can range from reasonable notice to 2 days or even more, depending on the jurisdiction. This notice is meant to respect the tenant’s right to privacy while allowing the landlord to perform necessary property management tasks.

Does a landlord have to give 24-hour notice before entering?

Many states do require landlords to give a 24-hour notice before entering a rental property, but this is not universal. Some states may require different notice periods, and some don’t specify a timeframe at all, instead using terms like “reasonable notice.” It’s important for landlords and tenants to refer to their state’s specific laws or their lease agreement to determine the required notice period.

Can a landlord access property without permission?

Generally, a landlord cannot access a rental property without permission unless it’s an emergency situation where immediate access is necessary to prevent damage to the property or to address a safety concern. For non-emergency access, landlords must provide proper notice as required by state law and the lease agreement. Unauthorized entry by a landlord can be considered a violation of tenant privacy rights.

Can a tenant deny access to a landlord?

Tenants can deny access to a landlord if the landlord fails to provide proper notice or attempts to enter for reasons not stipulated in the lease or by state laws. However, if a landlord has provided appropriate notice and the entry is for a legitimate reason, such as repairs, inspections, or showings, the tenant generally cannot unreasonably refuse access. If a tenant consistently denies access unlawfully, they may be in violation of the lease agreement, and the landlord may have legal grounds to take action.

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Leases.
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